Become A Better Subject Matter Expert With Scoop.it

Create a page to share your interests with others

 

  • Think of Scoop.it as a newspaper where you get to choose the stories you want to share with others.
  • Scoop.it is based around what they call Topics.  A Topic is the page that is automatically generated for you based on your area of interest or expertise. Each Topic is made up of Scoops which are essentially the articles that make up the content of your Topic.
  • Scoop.it also makes it easy to share your scoops on other social media platforms including blogs.

How I Use It

To say I use Scoop.it is not the whole truth. I barely make a mark on the surface of Scoop.it and use only 0.1% of what it offers. Largely because I feel it is ‘another’ tool that might or might not be better than what I currently use and I can’t figure out whether it is or it isn’t.

What I do use it for (and find it very valuable) is as an alert service similar to what I use Google Alerts for. In fact I set up a Scoop.it account at the same time as I set up a Google Alert for digital literacy because I wanted to see how different (or similiar) the content was.

What I have found is that Scoop.it has a broader international scope in comparison to Google Alerts and tends to feature content from youtube, twitter and blogs whereas Google Alerts captures New Zealand content much better. There are overlaps but not enough to warrant one over the other.

How Others Use It

  1. Deakin University Library uses Scoop.it with the Business and Law Faculty.
  2. John Shank uses Scoop.it to share information about blended librarianship.
  3. The University of San Fransisco uses Scoop.it to track their hashtags.
  4. Trudy Raymakers uses Scoop.it to collect ideas for libraries from libraries all over the world.

I would really like to use the full benefits of Scoop.it but struggle to figure out how this might have a greater impact than what I am already doing. If you have any tips, I’d love to hear them.

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